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Social Media Toolkit

How Local Politics Shape the Criminal Justice System

With nearly 2.3 million people throughout the United States locked up in jails, prisons, immigrant detention centers, and other forms of confinement, mass incarceration and criminal justice reform have rightfully begun to command widespread attention. Indeed, an ACLU poll found that 91% of Americans support some form of criminal justice reform.

But while much of the national discussion centers on federal-level issues like the War on Drugs, the majority of people currently incarcerated in the U.S. entered the system at the state and local levels. With millions of lives in the balance, local officials are the ones who exert the greatest influence on the day-to-day dysfunction of their criminal justice systems.

In our first series, How Local Politics Shape The Criminal Justice System, we explore the roles these local officials play and how activists and organizers across the US are working to create change in their communities.

Help Us Share Our First Series

Use our sample posts below, or draft your own! Click here to download graphics to share our series on social media.

Twitter

#MassIncarceration starts at the local level. Check out “How Local Politics Shape the Criminal Justice System,” a new #criminaljustice series by @ourprisms, and learn how activists and organizers are working to spark change in their communities: http://bit.ly/prismlocal #cjreform

Who are the local officials shaping the US #criminaljustice system? Learn how you can help push for #CJReform in your community in a new series by @ourprisms: http://bit.ly/prismlocal

National discussion about #CJReform focuses on federal policies, but most incarcerated people enter the system on the local level. Read @ourprisms's new #criminaljustice series to learn how local politics are fueling mass incarceration - and what you can do to help end it: http://bit.ly/prismlocal

Instagram

Throughout the United States, 2.3 million people are currently locked up in jails, prisons, and immigrant detention centers. While the national discussion has focused on federal issues like the War on Drugs, the truth is that most incarcerated people enter the system through the state and local levels. In a new series by @ourprisms, you’ll learn about the local officials that shape our #criminaljustice system, and how activists and organizers across the country are working to create change. Visit www.ourprism.org to learn more. #cjreform

Facebook/LinkedIn

Throughout the United States, 2.3 million people are currently locked up in jails, prisons, and immigrant detention centers. While the national discussion has focused on federal issues like the War on Drugs, the truth is that most incarcerated people enter the system through the state and local levels. In Prism’s new series, you’ll learn about the local officials that shape our #criminaljustice system, and how activists and organizers across the country are working to create change. Read it here: http://bit.ly/prismlocal #cjreform